Posts Tagged With: cilantro

Shakshuka

Tomato Poached Eggs Feta Cilantro

We finished off the last 3/4 cup of oatmeal that was in the kitchen cupboard for breakfast this morning, so it was okay to have eggs for lunch.

One of our grocery stores has a magazine with coupons and recipe ideas. The January 2018 issue had several realistic recipes that I tore out to try later. Last week I made simple pork chops with a orange marmalade (which is still burnt onto my non-stick baking sheet). Today, I decided to try my hand at poaching eggs in a crushed tomato sauce.

Giant is trying to get us to purchase extra ingredients, or at least to buy them from their store. However, I stopped at three other stores to get the more unusual ingredients.  Aldi for feta: Since I had planned to purchase feta for a salad, it wasn’t an extra expense. Plus, Aldi’s has good cheeses at affordable prices.  Wegman’s for cilantro: Last weekend Giant was out of cilantro by the time I went shopping. Rather than taking the risk again, I ran to Wegman’s produce department while we were in the neighborhood. Although the bunch cost $1.99, it is as big as a bush and will fit into various menu items this week. ACME for roasted red peppers: They were having their buck-a-bag sale on salad spinach, green onions, iceberg lettuce, potatoes, etc. So it was worth going there to purchase the rest of the items on my grocery list.

Savory magazine noted that their recipe was inspired by a dish called shakshuka. If you look it up, the internet will tell you that it is popular in the Middle East and North Africa.

It could easily become popular in our apartment, too. Except that if you are used to bacon or sausage and hashbrowns with your eggs, the shakshuka and ciabatta might not be quite as filling.

Tomato-Poached Eggs with Feta

Ingredients

  • 1 shallot
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 oz jar roasted red peppers
  • 1 (15 oz) can petite diced tomatoes
  • ¼ tsp red pepper flakes
  • 4 large eggs
  • ½ loaf ciabatta bread
  • fresh cilantro, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta

Directions

  1. Peel, finely slice, then chop the shallot. Mince the garlic. Drain the roasted red peppers and chop them into small pieces. Puree the diced tomatoes in a food processor until just crushed. You want the texture to be somewhat chunky rather than a uniformly liquid sauce or paste.
  2.  In a large frying pan, sautee the shallot and garlic in the olive oil for 1-2 minutes.
  3. Add the crushed tomatoes, roasted red peppers, and red pepper flakes. Season with salt. Continue cooking the mixture, adjusting the heat to allow the vegetables to simmer.
  4. Using a spoon, make 4 wells in the sauce. Crack one egg into each well. Season eggs with salt and pepper. Cover the skillet and cook 6 min., until egg whites have set.  “Watch them like a hawk or they’ll turn into hard rubberies”. Remove the pan from the heat.
  5. Meanwhile, slice the bread and chop the cilantro. Garnish eggs with cilantro and feta. Serve with bread.

 

Advertisements
Categories: Breakfast, Cheese, Food and drink, sauces & condiments | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cooking from Memories

pork tomatillo stew

Memoir is an interesting genre. The work is autobiographical, but the author chooses to emphasize a specific theme and/or focus on a shorter period of their life rather than telling their whole story. I enjoy reading memoirs and biographies, because I can learn about worlds that are completely different than mine without leaving earth. Sometimes I am tempted to covet their wealth and opportunity.  At other times the character’s struggle and despair are such that I am reminded to be thankful for the eternal hope that I have.

One of my favorite popular authors is Ruth Reichl. When she shares stories from her past you can feel along with her. When she describes the aromas, flavors, and textures of an amazing meal you are as satisfied as if you had been sitting at the table with her.

Recipes are sprinkled through Reichl’s books. This morning I took inventory of the ones that are included in Tender at the Bone.  A stew made from pork and tomatillos was especially interesting to me, because the bag of tomatillos from Produce Junction was larger than I had needed for a large batch of green sauce.

Ruth instructs the cook to prepare the stew on the stovetop. However, my Saturday plans wouldn’t allow me to babysit a simmering stew for two hours. Instead, after browning the pork and sauteeing the garlic and onions, I tossed everything into a crockpot.

Four hours later, we were home and ready for supper. My husband said the “juice” was good, but he isn’t so sure about the beans being included. I can’t say that the stew was amazing, but I can’t say that it is the recipe’s fault, either. When I cut the recipe in half some of the ratios didn’t quite match.   Also, I don’t keep “dark beer” on hand, so my blackstrap molasses substitute certainly affected the flavor.

 

Categories: Books, Food and drink, Pork, stew | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Church Picnic

church picnic shelter

Summer is drawing to a close. Schools have started. Sunsets are coming more quickly.  Since the state parks close at dark this means that the time for grilling at the park will soon pass as well.

Our church family enjoyed a few hours together this past weekend. Planning and organization was made a bit easier by the use of Mailchimp. With this internet tool, attendees are invited via email to R.S.V.P. and sign up for items to contribute to the event.  When you visit the web page you are able to see which other guests have replied and what parts of the menu are already taken care of.  Depending on how the host sets up the form you can choose to be general or specific about what you plan to contribute.

I signed up to bring a side dish. Other categories included designated fruit salad, and bags of chips, so I figured that they were looking for something more like a vegetable when they typed in “side dish”.

Southern Living had a recipe for Street Corn Salad that looked attractive with the variety of colors. The simplicity of preparation was also attractive, since there were only two steps to follow:

  1. Combine first 4 ingredients; whisk in olive oil.
  2. Stir together corn, radishes, and tomatoes in a medium bowl. Gently stir in dressing; spoon mixture onto a serving platter, and sprinkle with cheese.

I made changes to the ingredients list in order to save money: eliminated the $1.99 radishes, used lemon juice instead of fresh limes, sea salt instead of kosher, thawed frozen corn instead of scraping kernels off the cob, substituted grape for cherry tomatoes, and used up the half container of feta cheese that was in my fridge instead of buying Cotija…should I even pretend it is the same recipe?

Here is my list of ingredients:

1/2 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 – 1 lb. bags frozen corn, thawed
1 pint grape tomatoes, cut into halves
1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled

corn-salad-feta-tomato-cilantro

 

Categories: Cheese, Food and drink, Salad, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.