Pork

Lazy Lingonberry Pork Roast

One of my coworkers recently retired. She’s using her new free time to sort through things in her house.  She tackled the kitchen and gave me some of her extra cookbooks and ingredients.

Thanks, Kathy, for the port, candied ginger, and the recipe for Crock Pot Cranberry Port Pork Roast.  I just changed out a few of the ingredients to use what I had on hand.

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Ingredients

2 (to 3) lbs boneless pork loin roast
1 (14 ounce) jar IKEA lingonberry preserves
1⁄3 cup port wine (or 1⁄3 cup cranberry juice)
1⁄4 cup sugar
1⁄2 small lemon, thinly sliced
1⁄3 cup raisins
1 garlic clove, minced
2 tablespoons candied ginger, diced
1⁄2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 teaspoon black pepper

3 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons cold water

rice, cooked

Directions

Put the roast in slow cooker.
In a bowl combine, lingonberry preserves, port, and sugar.
Stir in lemon, raisins, garlic, ginger, mustard, salt, and pepper.
Pour over roast. Cover and cook on low 6-7 hours or until meat is 170°F.
Remove roast and keep warm.

Prepare the gravy:

Pour 3 cups of cooking juices into a saucepan.
Bring to a boil.
In a separate, small bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in cold water.
Add this mixture to the saucepan.
Continue cooking the liquid for about one minute or until thickened and no longer cloudy.

Slice roast and serve over rice with sauce.

2 lbs pork will serve 4-5 people, depending on how hungry they are and what sides you serve. We ate roasted vegetable Ritz crackers with cream cheese while waiting for things to be reheat (2nd day) and had green beans and butternut squash custard.

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Categories: Food and drink, Pork, Rice, sauces & condiments | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cooking from Memories

pork tomatillo stew

Memoir is an interesting genre. The work is autobiographical, but the author chooses to emphasize a specific theme and/or focus on a shorter period of their life rather than telling their whole story. I enjoy reading memoirs and biographies, because I can learn about worlds that are completely different than mine without leaving earth. Sometimes I am tempted to covet their wealth and opportunity.  At other times the character’s struggle and despair are such that I am reminded to be thankful for the eternal hope that I have.

One of my favorite popular authors is Ruth Reichl. When she shares stories from her past you can feel along with her. When she describes the aromas, flavors, and textures of an amazing meal you are as satisfied as if you had been sitting at the table with her.

Recipes are sprinkled through Reichl’s books. This morning I took inventory of the ones that are included in Tender at the Bone.  A stew made from pork and tomatillos was especially interesting to me, because the bag of tomatillos from Produce Junction was larger than I had needed for a large batch of green sauce.

Ruth instructs the cook to prepare the stew on the stovetop. However, my Saturday plans wouldn’t allow me to babysit a simmering stew for two hours. Instead, after browning the pork and sauteeing the garlic and onions, I tossed everything into a crockpot.

Four hours later, we were home and ready for supper. My husband said the “juice” was good, but he isn’t so sure about the beans being included. I can’t say that the stew was amazing, but I can’t say that it is the recipe’s fault, either. When I cut the recipe in half some of the ratios didn’t quite match.   Also, I don’t keep “dark beer” on hand, so my blackstrap molasses substitute certainly affected the flavor.

 

Categories: Books, Food and drink, Pork, stew | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Brussels Sprouts

 

“I don’t even know what you’d do with it,” said the friend that offered me a food processor. One of the topics at the lunchroom table that afternoon was gambling, and I’d mentioned that I was waiting to see if I would win a sweepstakes that was giving away stand mixers. She was suprised that I don’t own one yet and that I don’t have a food processor either. Then she remembered that she had one in a box on her give-away shelf that she would be glad to let me have.

So, I had to do some research to see if I would really want a gadget that would take up space in my kitchen. What would I do with a food processor that I couldn’t do with a chef’s knife and/or a blender?

Google helped me come up with this list: potato latkes, yucca pizza dough, carrot salad, hummus, pesto, curry paste, date truffles, tzatziki, tomato sauce, and shaved brussels sprouts.

I was convinced enough to accept her offer.

I already had chickpeas, garlic, and olive oil, so hummus wouldn’t be a problem. Potatoes and onions for latkes? check! The shaved Brussels sprouts with cranberries recipe was tempting enough for me scribble “Brussels sprouts” down on my list of things to look for at the South Philly “Italian” market that weekend.

Saturday. After I’d taken the produce out of all the little bags from the market and put them away, I decided to take a look at the food processor. The cardboard pieces and bubble wrap were still wrapped around the pieces. But when I had taken everything out of the box, there was no metal blade. Perhaps they’d come up with a way for the plastic disc to to the work? No. So I re-wrapped the pieces and returned them to the puzzle box.

Thankfully, I had only purchased enough Brussels sprouts to make a test batch. With the  sharp blade of my 21-year-old chef knife, making shreds out of the miniature cabbages wasn’t too difficult. I even decided to slice a root of ginger to make my own crystalized ginger for the recipe.

shredded brussels sprouts craisins red onion

There were recipes for either cold or warm shredded sprouts. Rather than make a sort of coleslaw, I decided to braise the ingredients (in chicken broth) then add butter, salt, and pepper. The next evening I warmed the shredded Brussels sprouts with some pieces of leftover pork. Potato-and-Cheddar-cheese perogies were a satisfactory compliment to our meal.

Shredded Brussels Sprouts & Pierogies

Categories: Brussels sprouts, Food and drink, Pork, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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